{Alaskan} Island Life | Part 2

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Some time ago folks could purchase land for little expense if they could show contribution to the larger economy through some business venture; this house started as a bakery of sorts, selling pies to local fisherman, and the owners got a screaming deal on prime real estate.

A typical way to spend the afternoon was taking the skiff up one of the many inlets to check on nest sights, erosion realities, fish runs, and soak up the intense beauty nature had to offer. It wasn’t uncommon to count 50+ eagles in an hour’s time.

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Due to the shallow land base, the typical set ups of septic tanks and high volume water usage aren’t possible. Instead, outhouses, steam houses, and hand washing are the norm (Rick found my efforts to clean clothes via bucket and plunger hilarious). Drinking water is either brought out from Homer or siphoned off a local mountain side spring and then filtered (it’s part of the norm to always be checking the filter buckets and swapping out  batches of water), non-drinking water is provided by rain barrels, and food either comes directly from the island (kelp, fish, etc.) or is brought out from Homer with a careful consideration of how long items will keep. Though there wasn’t a great need for heating during my stay, the wood stack is always kept full.

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